In Recess #3: "Third Class Webelo"

While Ian is off on a boat somewhere, or maybe in the wilderness of Croatia (we're not super sure), Dan and Leah get up to speed on a surprisingly busy summer week at the Supreme Court. In additions to some briefs showing up, one case got the DIG treatment. And it's a bankruptcy case, so we bring in resident bankruptcy expert Danielle D'Onfro to make it understandable for the rest of us. Then, we have an interview with the great John Elwood, partner in Vinson & Elkins' Appellate practice group, and creator of SCOTUSblog's Relist Watch

The Annual: OT2016 in Review (ft. Nina Totenberg)

It’s the finale of our first season! To celebrate all that was OT2016, and to look to the year ahead, we went to the queen of SCOTUS radio herself: Nina Totenberg. We also dish out superlatives— best dig at an advocate, best quip in an argument, worst opinion, etc. And you’ll notice that we replaced the theme music with something a little more, well, custom. Thanks for an amazing first season of First Mondays, and #stayfirstie.

Much like the justices, we’ll be switching to a summer schedule. You can expect two episode a month, and if that’s not enough, become a Patreon subscriber to get two bonus episodes each month, too! Sign up for just $5/month at patreon.com/firstmondays.

OT2016 #24: "Six Degrees of Caleb Nelson"

We hash out another week of SCOTUS news, this time with guest host Leah Litman. Yes, we recap orders and opinions, but more importantly, we finally solve a weeks-long First Monday mystery: who began the clerks' happy hour tradition? And don't stop listening after the credits. Leah came armed with Beckles-related puns, and you need them in your life.

If you want more First Mondays, become a monthly subscriber at patreon.com/firstmondays. For just $5/month, you get bonus episodes and access to the Amici Slack channel, where you can procrastinate with fellow Firsties. Feeling generous? Want a leg up on your coworkers or classmates? Donating $20/month gets you access to live streams of us recording the episodes that everyone else hears days later. 

OT2016 #14: "Stone Cold, Lead Pipe Lock"

This week we try to get to the bottom of a death penalty issue, brought to light by a dissent to denial from Justice Sotomayor. (Two words: firing squad.) We also talk to immigration attorney Andrea Sáenz about the upcoming crimmigration case, Esquivel-Quintana v. Sessions, and Leah teaches us the key difference between an amicus brief and an animus brief (ba-dum-tsssss). And finally, hear Ian read a list of Supreme Court Justices who Judge Posner of the 7th Circuit does not deem "pretty good." (Hint: it's a long list.)

If you missed the first Amici bonus episode, you can still become a monthly subscriber to unlock it. You'll also be invited to join the special Slack channel for Firsties-- a chat room full of 90+ SCOTUS nerds talking law all day, every day.

But of course, if you like the show but can't swing a subscription, there are still plenty of ways to support us. Write us a review in iTunes, follow us on Twitter, and call the hotline!

OT2016 #7: "Do We Even Really Know the Name?"

The holiday season is in full swing—with the first opinion announcement of the year. This week on First Mondays, we recap the Court's decision in Bravo-Fernandez and the slew of new grants out of the most recent conference. We also have Danielle D'Onfro, Lecturer in Law at Washington University, to discuss Jevic, a major bankruptcy case that the Court will hear this week. But before we do, we've got a special dispatch from the Beckles oral argument from Professor Leah Litman, some very special fan mail from the Court-appointed amicus in Beckles, and a look at ways the Court might get to five in Jennings, about the indefinite detention of immigrants. We also preview the arguments this week in the Court's Virginia and North Carolina election cases, argued by former General Counsel of the Hillary for America team, Marc Elias.

And don't forget! First Mondays is hiring a producer, and we'll begin interviewing applicants very soon. If you're interested in the Supreme Court and are interested in getting in on the ground floor of a burgeoning media empire, get in touch with us by Twitter (@FirstMondaysFM) or by email: isamuel@law.harvard.edu and epps@wustl.edu

OT2016 #6: "Live By The Sword, Die By The Sword"

It's a jam-packed holiday episode of First Mondays! In this episode, we begin with thoughts on the election and—even more consequentially—the Court's DIG in Visa v. Osborn. We also recap the last of the November cases, and use our juridical clairvoyance to predict the November assignments. Joining us to preview the December calendar is Professor Leah Litman, who discusses Beckles v. United States, and we also discuss Jennings v. Rodriguez, about when you can detain people without bond who might be in the United States lawfully (the government's surprising answer: more often than you'd think).

First Mondays is also hiring! We're looking for someone (probably a smart law student, but not necessarily) to work with us a couple of hours a week, as a podcast editor and producer, as the First Mondays media empire grows. If you enjoy the work of the Supreme Court, think it would be fun to work with Dan and Ian, and have some basic familiarity with audio editing software, drop us an email (isamuel@law.harvard.edu and epps@wustl.edu) or get in touch via Twitter (@FirstMondaysFM).

Correction: This episode suggested that the Hogan Lovells team of attorneys that worked on Visa v. Osborn and Dietz v. Bouldin were identical. While there was substantial overlap between the two teams, Leila Mongan and Daniel J.T. Schuker worked on Dietz but not Visa, and Benjamin Fleming and Eugene Sokoloff worked on Visa but not Dietz.